Thursday, December 8, 2011

Better Butter

Butter makes everything better. Popcorn, cookies, toast - where would they be without butter?

One of the downsides to the dairy product, however, is its fat content. It's really not that not good for us - although, everything is good in moderation. I won't even go into the story about how, when I was little, I literally ate butter by the spoonfuls....

Regardless, there's now a healthier butter substitute that is rich, creamy and full of flavor: Melt.


The kind folks at Melt offered to send me two tubs of their better-for-you butter, and I've since sampled their product in several different ways.

The main differences between Melt and real butter: Melt is organic and consists of virgin coconut oil, flax seed oil, palm fruit oil and canola oil. I first tried Melt in one of the most traditional ways possible - spread on my toast at breakfast, alongside some scrambled eggs.


I then tried Melt in my roasted broccoli. I simply roasted the broccoli with some extra virgin olive oil, salt and pepper; while it was roasting, I melted some Melt with minced garlic and lemon juice. When the broccoli was done roasting, I poured the Melt over it and sprinkled some sunflower seeds over the dish.


When I took the first bite of my toast, one flavor was more apparent than the others: coconut. The coconut oil, especially when melting Melt, is potent. However, I will say that initial punch of coconut flavor dissipated as I ate, and by the end of my meal, I completely forgot that I wasn't eating real butter. 

Over the broccoli, the Melt was fantastic. It wasn't overly heavy or greasy, and it added a slightly sweet flavor to the otherwise bitter broccoli. I also loved the texture of Melt, pre-melted - it almost has a whipped consistency, and it's incredibly rich and smooth. 

Melt is available at several stores, and you can also buy Melt online here (two tubs cost $7.98). 

For a healthier alternative to butter - with great added flavor - I could definitely see myself buying Melt again. I'm excited to use the remaining Melt I have in cookies for the holidays. I'm sure the slight coconut flavor will go really well with chocolate!

Would you trade up real butter for Melt? Why or why not?

Disclaimer: Despite Melt's generosity in letting me try their product free of charge, the opinions expressed in this post are honest and 100 percent my own. 


9 comments:

  1. While I adore making healthy substitutions, I don't know if I could ever give up real butter!

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  2. Melt is not in Whole Foods yet but we are trying to get it on shelf there.
    But feel free to ask your local store to stock Melt. We have a form to request Melt at http://www.meltbutteryspread.com/where-to-buy/request_melt/
    Thanks for trying Melt!

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  3. It sounds like it could be good in some baked goods where you'd want a little coconut flavor. I'm a butter girl all the way though. :)

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  4. Michelle, we've tried this before in our house and loved the smooth rich flavor. Another remarkable coconut product is coconut flour. I made some incredibly moist (carb-free, sugar-free) blueberry muffins with coconut flour and yacon syrup.

    You're right about the initial taste of coconut being a little strong at first, but it quickly disappears.

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  5. Which Whole Foods did you find it at?

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  6. sounds like a really cool product! I would try it but I am not sure I would ever trade in real butter for good!

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  7. I love butter way too much and am not a fan of palm oil, but Melt does sound like a good alternative for the right person. Plus, I LOVE the name!!

    Sues

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  8. Sorry about "anonymous". I'm Chris in Hampton Roads. No, I would NOT trade to Melt instead of butter in my baking, especially at Christmastime!! Since I never eat butter anyway, I figure I can have some at Christmas... ;) And I routinely eat "undressed" steamed broccoli-- yummy delicious!
    Why not? I can't imagine a butter cookie with all its attendant buttery issues that require butter, being made with something that's not butter. As for the broccoli, let's just say I don't need any fat on my broccoli....

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